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The Food and Travel Drinks Club
Castello Romitorio Romito

Castello Romitorio Romito

Price: £27.00
Region: Italy
Location: Tuscany
Vintage: 2005

The Romito del Romitorio has all the appeal of the best SuperTuscan blends. It has a rich, warm blackberry and plum character and with a little time in the glass provides a veritable black forest gateau on the nose. The palate is markedly different, showing intense dark fruits and layers of cedar. This is a wine of superb balance and seamless tannins with a long dry finish. Powerful but beautifully restrained with great structure, the Romito will continue to grow and develop up to 2015. Already drinking very well, but please ensure to decant long before drinking – up to 6 hours will reward drinkers with a much more expansive and complex wine.

More wines from this retailer

Recipe matches

A few delicious dishes to compliment your drink.

Duck breast with morels and Marsala sauce

Duck breast with morels and Marsala sauce

Ingredients

  • 20g dried morel mushrooms
  • 2 star anise
  • 4 duck breasts
  • 1 small red onion, peeled and finely chopped
  • 150ml dry Marsala
  • 4tbsp double cream

Method

Soak the morels in 100ml boiling water for half an hour. Drain and squeeze dry, reserving the water.

Crush the star anise in a spice grinder or mortar, and rub into the duck skin and season with salt and freshly ground black pepper. Cover with cling film and leave to marinate for half an hour.

Heat a heavy-based frying pan and, once it is hot, add the duck breasts skin-side-down. Cook over a medium heat for 5 minutes, or until the skin is brown and crisp. Pour off any excess oil, turn the duck over and cook the other side for 5 minutes. Add the red onion as the second side cooks, stirring it around in the duck fat. Once the duck is cooked through, add the morels and Marsala to the pan and gently bubble everything together for 5 minutes. Pour over the double cream and shake the pan to blend it into the sauce. Season well.

Lift the duck out of the sauce and either serve it whole or slice the breasts thinly on the diagonal. Serve with some sauce spooned over.

Ham hock, pearled spelt and roots potage

Ham hock, pearled spelt and roots potage

This keeps in the fridge in a large bowl for up to 4 days and improves for it. It sets to a firm jelly, so scoop out what you need – making sure you get an even share of all the solid bits in the bottom of the bowl – to boil for a few minutes for a quick lunch. There is no need to add salt as the ham has been brined and is sufficiently salty. You’ll need to begin this recipe a day ahead.

Ingredients

  • 1 x 1kg small ham hock (ask the butcher to trim it to the weight)
  • 1 large onion, quartered
  • 2 carrots, halved
  • 3tbsp rapeseed oil, plus extra for serving
  • 2 large banana shallots, diced to about 1cm
  • 500g swede, peeled and diced to about 1cm
  • 2 parsnips, peeled and diced to about 1cm
  • ½ celeriac, peeled and diced to about 1cm
  • 4 celery stems, sliced into 1cm pieces
  • 100g pearled spelt
  • 300ml fresh apple juice
  • handful of celery leaves

Method

Put the ham hock in a large pan and cover with cold water by about 2cm. Add the onion and carrot (don’t add salt). Bring to the boil and turn down to a gentle simmer for about 2-2½ hours until the meat is cooked and falling off the bone. Leave ham to cool and chill overnight. Skim the fat from the cooking liquid and reheat in a large pan. When the ham is cool enough to handle, remove all the meat from the bone in chunky pieces and set aside (discard the rest). Drain the carrots and onions from the liquid through a sieve (reserve vegetables). Keep about one-third of the cooking liquid and pour it into a liquidiser with the vegetables and whizz to a purée.

Heat the oil in a large wok and add the shallot, swede, parsnip, celeriac and celery. Stir-fry until the vegetables just begin to show the odd speck of golden brown. Add the purée to the pan along with the spelt and apple juice and bring to the boil. Cook at a simmer for about 20 minutes until just tender. Add the reserved meat and a handful of chopped celery leaves, heat on low for 5 minutes, then serve with a sprinkle of black pepper and a little extra oil drizzled over the top.

Slow-braised pork hocks with honey and Marsala

Slow-braised pork hocks with honey and Marsala

Rare-breed pork, such as Gloucester Old Spot, would be sublime for this recipe. Order the pork hocks in advance from any accommodating butcher and ask him to remove the skin and trim them. Hocks taken from the forequarters will be daintier than those from the chunkier hindquarters.

Ingredients

  • 2 cloves
  • 12 juniper berries
  • 2 garlic cloves
  • 12 sage leaves
  • 2tbsp finely chopped rosemary
  • 2tbsp extra virgin olive oil
  • 6 small pork hocks, skin removed
  • 2tbsp set honey
  • 3 large onions, peeled and sliced
  • 500ml well-flavoured beef stock
  • 200ml gutsy red wine
  • 200ml Marsala
  • 1 bay leaf

Method

Using a mortar and pestle or spice grinder, grind the cloves and juniper berries together, Add the garlic and sage and keep grinding until you have an even-textured paste. Stir in the chopped rosemary and olive oil. Rub the spice and herb mixture all over the pork hocks, cover and leave in the fridge for several hours, overnight if possible.

When you are ready to cook the meat, preheat the oven to 220°C/425 °F/Gas 7. Warm the honey until it is runny and brush it liberally all over the meat. Season with salt and a generous grinding of black pepper and roast for 30 minutes. Remove from the oven and turn down the heat to 190°C/375°F/Gas 5. Tuck the sliced onions underneath the hocks, pour over the stock, wine and Marsala, add the bay leaf and return to the oven. Check after 1½ hours but aim to cook for around 2 hours (depending on the size of the hocks), basting regularly. The meat should be very tender and falling off the bone.

Serve with a scoop of the melting onions. Pour the sauce out of the roasting tin into a serving jug and pass it around at the table.

This article was published on 1st February 2012 so certain details may not be up to date.